Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Any details you care to add about rebuilds, problems solved, how to do etc,
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Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by bachus »

Hi all, I am weighing up options if I buy a small Mercury 240 dinghy (inflatable). Why I like this dinghy is the stored weight. The 200cm is 16kg, the 240cm is 20 to 22kg (weights differ depending on the advertising). This is not an air deck dinghy - those are 36kg+ and not a tenable solution for a small yacht IMO.
To begin with I will use the oars.
But I am looking at motor options.

Electric:
Small 12volt electric is approx $170 but then the battery needs to be considered - maybe 20AH at 7kg to 40AH AGM at 14kg but then the weight is starting to creep up and the mercury has a softish floor so no where to park said battery (maybe slung under the seat?)
Lithium is not an option. The current drain will be too high for small lithium batteries - need 50AH or above to get the discharge current needed so costs start to rise significantly.
But the Electric ensemble can be stowed in the cabin with no disassembly and will not smell and orientation is not critical.

Petrol:
Best bang per volume.
But storage is the issue in a Castle 650. Limited rail space to "hang off a rail" and due to smell not feasible to store in the cabin.
There is an interesting option though. A weed eater type motor on a shaft. The plus side here is that the motor head can be removed from the shaft (4 bolts) and the tiller (with the motor controls attached) removed from the shaft easily. The shaft stowed in the cabin area and the motor and tiller in the fuel locker. Yes some assembly required but heck pumping up the dinghy will take more time.

So now down to the question I have.
The weed eater options like here https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/174788230448 and here https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/254444866539 mean that the motor is running in what I think is not going to be good for the motor. These are four stroke with an oil sump and although the motor is a weed eater type with a flexible orientation - the orientation here is nothing like it would be for normal weed eater / brush cutter use - being vertical or shaft down. Is my thinking correct? Will the motor survive this?

The other option I have to to buy the shaft assembly and use the motor head from my Victa brush cutter ( assume the same clutch assembly attachment and bolt pattern) - it is 2 stroke though and motor orientation will not matter but that means carrying two full mixes.
Jim
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by Peter Yates »

Would you not be better off with a 2.3HP Honda? I have a 5HP Mercury as the main motor on Tricksy but I found that the long-leg Honda fits in one of the stern lockers in the right storage position. It only weighs 12kg so I keep it as a “reserve” motor. It gets the Investigator along at over 4 knots. You should be able to pick up a short shaft one relatively cheaply.
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by bachus »

Peter Yates wrote: Sep 25th, '21, 11:30 Would you not be better off with a 2.3HP Honda? I have a 5HP Mercury as the main motor on Tricksy but I found that the long-leg Honda fits in one of the stern lockers in the right storage position. It only weighs 12kg so I keep it as a “reserve” motor. It gets the Investigator along at over 4 knots. You should be able to pick up a short shaft one relatively cheaply.
There is an older 2HP 4str Honda long shaft on Gumtree at present that is tempting but I have no place to store it outside the cabin. The Fuel locker on the Castle is the only locker and is not big enough. Yes a reserve motor would be nice.
Jim
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by zebedee »

Jim, I had Peter's old Yamaha 2hp (via Greg) hung off the starboard side of my stern on a pad mounted to the solar panel vertical and the horizontal strut forward to the original rear stanchion. Would you like to borrow the motor for a trial? Also, I think Adrian has two Honda BF2.2 motors (and an inflatable dinghy); maybe have a chat to him?
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by Furstin »

On the sonata I had mount on the angle and put a pvc pipe with bimini fitting to toe rail.

By the time the outboard is clamped on it ain't going anywhere.

I thought the pushpit was similar but see they aren't really, but 2 halves of a timber block with pushpit ark routed out and pipe to toenail would work?


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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by Castle 610 »

My question is always why not just row it? Carrying two motors on a Castle does sounding hard work. How far would you be rowing?
For a QLD trip where you might be rowing a long way consider a hard dinghy.
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by barnaclephill »

Castle 610 wrote: Sep 25th, '21, 13:23 My question is always why not just row it?
Because it is more fun to be a temporary petrolhead, and sometimes you need to quickly deploy a kedge anchor against waves/wind, and you need the power a motor can give. Sometimes also, I use a dinghy at Lake Eildon, far from the yacht, so a small 12 or 10kg motor is ideal, with 5 miles on the 1 litre tank (tested).

I have a 2HP 2stroke old but working OB I bought at auction. It is spare and could go for $120 if you're interested. Can try it out in my water rubbish bin here.
When you run the carby dry, these motors do not smell in the locked cabin. I've done it, no fumes.
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by Furstin »

inflatables row like pigs.

We're going away for 4 night for Oct lwe, am struggling to see the need to take inflatable and 5, when we can pretty much stick with 2 paddles boards, so maybe think about that? (We mostly use as kayaks, sitting on a foam block so very stable stow very well both inflated and rolled up, and do most things we want from a dinghy. )
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by bachus »

Castle 610 wrote: Sep 25th, '21, 13:23 My question is always why not just row it? Carrying two motors on a Castle does sounding hard work. How far would you be rowing?
For a QLD trip where you might be rowing a long way consider a hard dinghy.
Not far
Hence my statement row first but investigate the motor side.
Where row?
Some examples:
Port Arlington - to see if the beaching area for yachts aka area available to beach "tenders" is still destroyed by the dredging (destroyed meaning mud to the top of the thighs and higher). Visit planned before Christmas IF we are allowed . . .
Edwards point (Swan Bay) to see if the way into the lagoon is safe (enough to float through the entrance). Any hull with a skeg "can" have difficulties here and the Castle qualifies, Sonata 26 glides in.
The ability to set another anchor as well.
Stuff like that . . no long distance stuff initially.
Jim
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by bachus »

Furstin wrote: Sep 25th, '21, 12:58 On the sonata I had mount on the angle and put a pvc pipe with bimini fitting to toe rail.

By the time the outboard is clamped on it ain't going anywhere.

I thought the pushpit was similar but see they aren't really, but 2 halves of a timber block with pushpit ark routed out and pipe to toenail would work?


Image
No room like that for me.
Life preserver on the port rear stanchions and solar panel on the starboard side rear stanchions. Bimini clutters this area as well.
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by impulse »

The Honda 2.3Hp air cooled 4 stroke is a noisy little sucker.
Cheers Robin.

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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by Furstin »

Yeah but it's used infrequently and has no impeller, bit of a win.

I still prefer 2 stroke for a tender, but .....
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by PaulS »

Don’t have a heap of experience with it but we have an Achilles LT4 (Hypalon construction) 4 person traditional inflatable with a Honda 2.3HP. The motor is very light as it has no gearbox I bought it from Kathmandu on special delivered to my rural address.

It goes quite quick enough and is an actual 4 person dinghy which is pretty stable and light.

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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by Jon »

I have gone from 2.5m Cadet Zodiac with first a Honda 2.3Hp, too noisy then a little Yamaha 2 stroke which was much better.
But I sold it three years ago to buy two drop stitched inflatable kayaks and have not regretted the change. Stows better, inflates in less than 5mins each and they paddle faster than the Honda used to push the Zodiac. They also weight 12kg each.
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by rseydler »

More info on the yaks?

Our inflatable is on the way out and looking for replacements.
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by Jon »

I have two of these

https://www.seaeagle.com/RazorLite

There are a few brands, the Sea Eagle and several other brands appear to be made in Korea but there are now Chinese copies.

I had my first Razorlite for four years and I used it a lot when I was working on a hydrographic survey ship in the SW Pacific to check out remote places. They are a pvc inflatable and the tropics are hard on pvc. I had the first seam leak in Lankai, repaired it then for the next trip the same kayak had a major seam failure in Vanuatu. The kayak couldn't be paddled home on two chambers That Seaeagle 393RL Razorlite was replaced by seaeagle under warranty, it was an early production model.

I bought my fiancee one and we used them a fair bit on the Great Barrier Reef, as tender replacements to islands.

Longest trip was two day solo trip unsupported around Garden and Carnac Is on the razerlite. I have slept on beaches at night just deflating the floor until the comfort level is right. Throw a hootchie cover over the kayak then you have your own warm, waterproof coffin for the night.

The unresolved issue in my mind is how long they will last, a cheap knock off might be worth investigating.

This is a good summary.
https://www.paddleventure.com/drop-stitch-kayak/
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by Furstin »

You have to ask if you need dry, and if yes, what level of dry. Plus storage, deflating reinstating will get tired.

You can get a drop stitch sup for 200 or less, they stow inflated outside life lines and are great kayaks.
Just add a box or foam block to keep your ass dry. I weekly use to get to boat with shoes, trackies etc on, dry as. It's a dinghy for one imo.

I'm working on a stowable rowing rig for them, but kayak paddle has plenty of hp.

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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by Furstin »

Have two lots of these bunnings hooks for a sup either side, they are just wall brackets with tab bent to hook over life lines. All out of the way. They're a few dollars each.

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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by impulse »

Put them on the outside and they double as fenders.
Cheers Robin.

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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by Furstin »

Would be nice, I smacked the corner of a pontoon finger yesterday. who puts a squared end on a east west pontoon.

Put the 5 and 2.7 dinghy onboard. Motor fits in lazerette, but dinghy just below. It's nice to be able to run up the creek or around. I want to try the tackle I've made off the solar frame to lift outboard too.
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by impulse »

I left mine in reverse trying to dock the other day, thought she was a bit hard to hold onto. :lol:
They got these horrible plastic strips on the pontoons at Koolewong Marina, I smacked one in reverse, still can't get the marks off.
Normally I just drag the tinnie around with us but in certain situations it's a menace and I worry about coming back to the mooring and finding someone had nicked it. I'd have buckleys of getting the missus onto a surf ski.
Cheers Robin.

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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by Furstin »

Yeah, have the same when I have the whaler, can't leave and options are pull into front of rmyc to leave it there while I get a berth, then run to get it before it's bashed to bits by wash, or I tie painter to shrouds, on off side, with enough length to have it sit alongside transom, then when I spin to reverse in it into berth it floats out just past the bow.
Latter works well, but breeze direction dependant.

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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by impulse »

I ran out of fuel coming back from the marina the other day. Luckily the boss wasn't with me so I ended up have a nice peaceful sail. :twisted:
Cheers Robin.

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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by Furstin »

haha, classic.

I ran out right under the spit bridge in the 38 once, had a drum of diesel in the lazerette; you've never seen 20litre drum fly out so quick!

Better update that Sig : )
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Re: Small outboard motor for inflatable tender

Post by bachus »

Quoting myself to update some information after some research.
bachus wrote: Sep 25th, '21, 11:16 . . .
The weed eater options like here https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/174788230448 and here https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/254444866539 mean that the motor is running in what I think is not going to be good for the motor. These are four stroke with an oil sump and although the motor is a weed eater type with a flexible orientation - the orientation here is nothing like it would be for normal weed eater / brush cutter use - being vertical or shaft down. Is my thinking correct? Will the motor survive this?
. . . .
It would appear that the weed eater type motor is a very common adaption in the USA for canoes and such so I assume nothing wrong with vertical orientation of such motor heads. The better option is the Genuine Honda GX35 motor head. The clones are approx $90 cheaper but better to go the real thing I think. There is good video on building such:

The other attraction (besides that the motor head can be removed from the shaft) is that the shaft working length is adjustable - the transom clamps can be repositioned on the shaft.

There is a good review of the inflatable kayak options here:

I like the category 1,2 and 3 used. My initial thinking was that the polyester covered options would be in the sun protection area but eyes opening on the drying out factor . . any option needs to be fired before storing.

The drop stitch kayak option is good and an eye opener but the length will defeat me.
At 4+ metres in length to cary two persons they will have to be completely deflated for transport - such is not going to fit on the Castle. A Mercury 200 dinghy might fit upside down on the foredeck when partly deflated (my #3 jib I mostly use is cut high for cabin top sheeting and is not a deck sweeper jib). I can picture a custom cover over the dinghy for a) sun protection and b) holding the dinghy in place that clips to the side rails - the same cover allowing walk over access to the bow with no damage to the dinghy. More thinking . . .
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