Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

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zebedee
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by zebedee »

Yes, precisely my point. More than "just enough" bouyancy is better.
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Jon »

I didn't realise just how knackered the old mast was until it was up against the new one. I realise now it is bent at the end of the internal splice sleeve.

Changing the fittings over is a slow job. I am building it to plan and not as per the old skiff rig.Image
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Jon »

I have the new mast built after three days of measuring three times and cutting once. Karl's (Lightspars) tapered mast is an industrial work of art that I love to look at. The plan is to raise the mast tomorrow after a sleep. I have had understanding neigbours with a 5:30 starts on the mast before work and the working to 11 in the evenings. Three layers of thermals on for the negative Canberra temperatures.


The most frustrating thing was mousing the internal halyards. I had bought an electricians conduit snake and I thought the job would be easy.

1hr: trying to feed the conduit snake down the mast. It doesn't work as the conduit spirals inside the larger diametre mast.
1hr: to Bunnings for three lengths of conduit. Conduit up the mast then run the snake up the conduit. Manage to get main halyard and topping lift this way.
1hr:. I can't get the snake throught the internal sheave exit blocks. Spent ages with bits of wire trying to fish the end out through the exit block but it didn't work.
1hr with one foot of 3mm electrical wire taped to the end of the conduit. Thought was I could fish the electrical wire out easy-didnt work.
5min. Had a rethink , though of making a reef anchor type hook on the end of the conduit. Stuffing it up the mast. Then stuffing the halyards through their turning blocks .Then pull out the conduit and out come three halyards ok n the first shot. Easy.

Picture of the 'reef hook' for getting out halyards.
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Jon »

How do you store your spare sails when cruising.

I have three jibs, 1, 2, 3. I'm thinking of rolling the two I'm not using on pvc pipes and storing one each side on the deckhead above the quarterberths. The is a recess there that will fit most of the tube but it will make the quarter berths squeezier. A fishing rod down the centre of each pvc tube for storage.

Is there a better way to store the jibs?
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by INMA »

Just use the #1 and mainsail.

Are you really keen to do head sail changes while cruising?

The mainsail is the main power source and being able to reef it quickly while stressed is important.

If you are concerned about light air performance, take more fuel for the engine.
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Jon »

My son is a past ACT young crew of the year. I need headsail changes and the occasional spinnaker run to keep him interested.

Don't you find ghosting along in a very light breeze a really nice part of sailing? Your boat moving slowly but efficiently thorough the water. People moving smoothly on the boat not to upset it and plenty of time for good conversation.

There is a time and place for the eggbeater but I am trying to build this boat with the intent of using it less.
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Gezza »

Roller reefer, one sail no hassle and easy to stow, just pull the rope and gone and no storage problems.But probably won't keep your sun interested. Then again use the spinnaker for light wind sailing, that should keep him happy. Nice to see kids wanting some action and be interested.
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Castle 610 »

We usually swap between two jibs whether racing or cruising. Store one on deck, the other under the quarter berth. Agree with you.. no point having a sailing boat then motoring everywhere!
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Jon »

Thanks for the replies. I will rig up something temporary and after more cruising experience will see if the efficiency bug stops.

A second question. Next week I am thinking of modifying my rudder case with a rudder latch as shown in the picture below. As you lift the rudder the latch locks into a v in the trailing edge. It seems to be a simple to make effective solution. Any downsides from owners?
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by zebedee »

The only downside I can see is that the notch is in the section which is usually in the water. You probably want a line you can pull to raise the lever and release it.

Rotated and cropped; click on the image for the original rotated and uncropped:
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by luke.sleeman »

Would a piece of shock cord be better at retaining the rudder? You might even be able to get away without the notch in the rudder.

As to the image rotation, it's due to app developers, image processing tools, etc not properly handling the exif rotation metadata on images. Unfortunately there is not much to be done, but complain to the offending app developer :?

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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by AZAmagnum »

Jon wrote:Thanks for the replies. I will rig up something temporary and after more cruising experience will see if the efficiency bug stops.

A second question. Next week I am thinking of modifying my rudder case with a rudder latch as shown in the picture below. As you lift the rudder the latch locks into a v in the trailing edge. It seems to be a simple to make effective solution. Any downsides from owners?
Image
Picture taken at Fremantle YC 2016, how come my photos rotate after uploading?
Will this be for motoring, launching, beaching or trailering ?

I'd try to avoid drilling holes or notches. But if you were to do so, I'd drill and epoxy line 2 holes for a stainless pin to go thru (to rest on top of rudder box). First hole for blade at prop height, second hole for blade at fully retracted height.

Simple solutions are,
Trailering - the blade is in its bag in the boat.
Launching - the blade is in its bag in the boat. I have seen webbing strap or piece of line slung under the blade to support it.
Motoring/beaching - the blade can be held at prop height by a very soft door wedge, or a piece of line from the top of the rudder blade to the backstay.
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by zebedee »

Have a look at the rudder box on a Sabre dinghy for more ideas. They're an open backed drop rudder design with shockcord to provide friction and allow the rudder to burst out if run aground.

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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Furstin »

Our compass had a nut welded to the box with a bolt that had a wing on one end and a small plate on the other, you could adjust the height infinity and just tighten when happy. Worked well., no holes.

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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Jon »

Thanks for the ideas. I'm trying to achieve a one handed raising of the rudder from full depth to level with the bottom of the bulb when I'm entering shallow water.

I have sewn up a padded rudder storage case. The rudder is removed until the boat is launched and before retrieval. At anchor the rudder is either left down or lifted up and the top pinned to the end of the boom. As my mast is forward the boat rides better at anchor with a lot of windage aft.

It is a heavy approx 1.8m long blade.

I am in the passenger seat going across the Hay Plain so I can't take a photo. Below is the best I have on hand.
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Davop »

that info on sail draft was good INMA. thanks
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Jon »

The windows will hopefuly be bonded in today with Fixteck then it will be 3 weeks before it fully dries. It has taken several days to cut the window openings out and then to seal and gelcoat the raw fibreglass and foam edges.

I have raised and lowered the new mast several times with the braked winch. It is the first one I have used and they are a fantastic device after using always using ratchet winches in the past. They are so much safer. The front mast crutch telescopics up and down for raising. I can also lift out the winch pole and use it as a gin pole off the mast foot if needed. I have been using baby stays but I am going to try Zebees stay system for extra control in cross breezes when raising.

The aft mast crutch is made from a windsurfer mast and it seems to be going well.

When I went to the sailmaker for the new main I got new standing rigging and the mast prebend set. It will be another week before the main arrives then I will have to sew covers for the boom.

I ended up using a large wedge for the rudder lock. I bought the stainless and fabricated the device shown above but have decided for now to keep it simple. I will see how the wedge works in practice first.

Hopefully this weekend I will manage to bond in the bulkhead for the new kitchen. I'm not very happy with my current fibreglassing skill levels I and currently too messy. Twenty years ago I used to manage a composite fabrication shop and my drop in skill level over those twenty years has been massive. Hopefully if I keep tinkering on the small jobs my skills will come up again.

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Solar panel on a pole.

Post by Jon »

I can't find a relevant thread but I have seen solar panels mounted on a pole with a swivel mount at the top to angle the solar panel. Where do you get them from?

I want to mount a 100w solar panel at the stern on a telescopic pole. Have the panel down at the top of staunchon pole height when sailing and trailering. Up higher at anchor or while the boat cover is on.
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by INMA »

I have two of these in the rear deck to mount the BBQ, solar panel and other accessories.

http://www.bcf.com.au/Product/Blueline- ... ite/223901

My 10 Watt panel sits on one of these modified to hold the panel.

http://www.bcf.com.au/Product/Blueline- ... ard/223910
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Re: Solar panel on a pole.

Post by bachus »

Jon wrote:I can't find a relevant thread but I have seen solar panels mounted on a pole with a swivel mount at the top to angle the solar panel. Where do you get them from?

I want to mount a 100w solar panel at the stern on a telescopic pole. Have the panel down at the top of staunchon pole height when sailing and trailering. Up higher at anchor or while the boat cover is on.
This one?

Image

and the rear view of the frame.

Image

The panel is mounted on a frame. The panel is approx 2kg and this is why I can get away with this. The frame is light alloy angle from Bunnings cut and pop riveted together. The panel is then bolted to the frame. The centre angles are spaced to allow a pole to be placed between them with a bolt through the frames and rod. This is the pivot point. The arms go down to a spare bicycle handlebar accessories clamp I had - this clamp is loose and allows the clamp to move up and down the shaft and thus the angle of the panel to be adjusted. The shaft rotates in it's socket attached to the stanchion. I use cheap sprung loaded hand clamps to hold the sliding bit in the correct position to the sun.

No reason that same could not be done with a telescopic system mounted in one the fishing rod holders Greg detailed. Maybe a cheap three section boat hook thingy?

Note I used stainless bolts and proofed them against corroding the alloy with Tefgel.
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Jon »

INMA and Jim. Both good replies and have got me thinking about different options.
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Pirate »

luke.sleeman wrote:Would a piece of shock cord be better at retaining the rudder? You might even be able to get away without the notch in the rudder.

I've just built a new rudder case for my RL24 and have looked at many options for the "locking mechanism" of which to use.
I've decided that none of them are totally ideal and each has a distinct flaw in one way or another.

The shock-cord system is cheap and an easy fix but it MUST be maintained in excellent condition and checked regularly.
Ive seen quite a few dagger rudders floating away as crews scramble to regain control and then the subsequent recovery of the often expensive blade.
In some examples many fit a plastic tube over the shock-cord to "protect" the cord from the cutting action of the trailing edge as the blade is lowered or raised, again its a bandaid solution but atleast its better than the bare cord.

My new ruddercase is still under construction and I've been brain-storming new ways to overcome the many issues that we have with most systems..... I'm playing with a simple locking hinge being controled with a couple of small blocks and a pivioting auto-release clam-cleat....

Fingers crossed
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by Jon »

Luke this is my preferred rudder system if I was starting from scratch. I had one of these on my Taipan catamaran for several years and it works well and is simple.
The glass fibre rod holds the rudder down with a pin. If you ground the the rod bends and the rudder comes up. They are adjustable for tension so you can tune them not to pop out at 15kts when you hit a jelly fish. They also have a second hole in the tiller stock to lock the rudder up.

They would work on a larger rudder.

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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by INMA »

INMA's rudder has worked flawlessly for 15 years. It has a bungy that is rigged to hold the back of the foil in the rudder box.

Don't over think drop rudders, just copy INMA's design. Its featured in other posts on rudders.
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Re: Refit of an Elliott 7.4.

Post by INMA »

Nothing is free, abuse the environment and nature will make us pay the cost with interest.

Anyone ignoring the environment, is probably neglecting our children's future.
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