Dropping the anchor

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impulse
Able Skipper
Posts: 1157
Joined: Oct 17th, '06, 00:27
Location: sydney

Re: Dropping the anchor

Post by impulse » Oct 10th, '18, 19:46

I have an electric windlass on the RL.
There's is no easy way of saying this but, it is without a doubt the very best mod I have made on the boat. Well, except for maybe the electric keep pump. :lol:
Seriously, once you have one you will wonder why it took you so long to do it.
Remember it is not just about raising the anchor, the ability drop the anchor via remote from the comfort and convenience of the helm is a godsend. 8)
Cheers Robin.

Robin & Terry.
RL28 - QE3.

Castle 610
Yachtmaster
Posts: 2074
Joined: Oct 26th, '06, 20:20

Re: Dropping the anchor

Post by Castle 610 » Oct 10th, '18, 22:20

Wow its getting complicated!
Stephen
Castle 650 'Mad Mouse'
Sabre 1205 'Wasp'
Nacra 14sq 'Vamoose'

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colect149
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Joined: Oct 29th, '06, 00:55
Location: Somerville Victoria

Re: Dropping the anchor

Post by colect149 » Oct 10th, '18, 23:47

I solved the Anchor Dance negatives with a Cooper anchor. For the Farr 7500 I had the 3.5Kg aluminium one with the required length of stainless chain (for our purposes work hardening is not an issue) very easy. For the 5000 I am looking at their largest plastic one. They claim for boats up to 5m. Any anchor that will break a 18mm nylon tow rope and still does not let go is worth considering.
Farr 5000 Tow hack Kia Sportage 2l FWD, Avan Camper, 1967 MGB roadster, 1932 Austin 7 Sports.

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zebedee
Admiral
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Joined: May 9th, '07, 02:05
Location: Bayside Melbourne

Re: Dropping the anchor

Post by zebedee » Oct 10th, '18, 23:59

impulse wrote:
Oct 10th, '18, 19:46
I have an electric windlass on the RL.
There's is no easy way of saying this but, it is without a doubt the very best mod I have made on the boat. Well, except for maybe the electric keep pump. :lol:
Seriously, once you have one you will wonder why it took you so long to do it.
Remember it is not just about raising the anchor, the ability drop the anchor via remote from the comfort and convenience of the helm is a godsend. 8)
I had a PVC pipe hawser down the foredeck of my Dennis which allowed me to drop and retrieve anchor from the cockpit. Like your windlass, it was one of the better features of that boat.
A man's boat is his Castle. The Gippsland Lakes are my moat. Castle 650 #10, Roller Coaster.

Harb
Inshore Skipper
Posts: 228
Joined: Dec 13th, '15, 14:05
Location: WA

Re: Dropping the anchor

Post by Harb » Oct 11th, '18, 22:13

zebedee wrote:
Oct 10th, '18, 01:28
Not mine but this is what they look like:
Thanks, looks interesting. I can see why they would hold better in sand and mud being so much wider then a Danforthc so its something to consider when I'll get around to make my own anchor.
The gliding part not so sure , unless you dropped it in at least 20-30 mtr depth or was made out of thin sheetmetal you could probably throw it further then it would glide on its own.

Harb
Inshore Skipper
Posts: 228
Joined: Dec 13th, '15, 14:05
Location: WA

Re: Dropping the anchor

Post by Harb » Oct 11th, '18, 23:21

zebedee wrote:
Oct 10th, '18, 23:59

I had a PVC pipe hawser down the foredeck of my Dennis which allowed me to drop and retrieve anchor from the cockpit.
On a previous small cabin cruiser where access to foredeck was through the hinged windows designed to fit only preschool kids or climbing on top of the cabin which wasn't safe even in moderate seas I ended up running the anchor line through a small SS ring tied to a few meters of rope running back to the cockpit. I'd secure the anchor line to bow cleat before leaving home and kept the anchor, chain and line out of the way in a milk crate under my seat. When launching the anchor line would drag the short rope & ring along the side of the hull with ring just ahead of the bow , to retrieve it I'd pull the short rope and the ring would bring the anchor line back to the cockpit. Worked like a charm and could preset the anchor line length at home or before getting into choppy waters if going fishing in shallow waters and didn't need the entire length.

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bachus
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Joined: Jan 24th, '13, 20:43
Location: Bayside, Melbourne

Re: Dropping the anchor

Post by bachus » Oct 12th, '18, 06:21

I have tried this but found the technique does not work in a tide way. As you pull the anchor rode back to the cockpit the hull swings broadside to the tide and increases the tension on the anchor considerably and there you stop broadside on to the tide. Yes baysiders, that is why I was late leaving the channel fort last round the bay cruise. So yes this may work but pick your situations. Ie wind or tide = no go.
Jim
Castle 650 #96. Mystic.
Tow hack: Ford Territory TX SZ MkII Auto AWD

Harb
Inshore Skipper
Posts: 228
Joined: Dec 13th, '15, 14:05
Location: WA

Re: Dropping the anchor

Post by Harb » Oct 12th, '18, 23:09

I guess it depends on the size of the boat and your own strength. On the 14' cabin cruiser I had no problems pushing it against tide although most of the time was lazy and used the outboard to ride on top of the anchor and used the stern cleat to pull it out of sand. A bit harder to do on my 20ft cat that is twice as heavy, more windage and only small tiller outboard but is still doable. I wouldn't like my chances in strong winds or on a larger & heavier boat bit I guess I'd be looking at an electric windlass then.

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